East Rose Window

This window was designed in a collaboration between the artist Kiki Smith and the architect Deborah Gans. Because of the large individual panels required by the Smith/Gans design, each of the six main panels is about 30 square feet, the traditional stained glass technique used in the origin windows was not an option. Additionally the design called for 2 dissimilar layers of antique glass, so The Gil Studio proposed a lamination technique utilizing a 2 part optically clear silicone in which the 2 layers of art glass are laminated to a base layer of 3/8” thick clear laminated glass. This technique allowed the creation of the window without lead cames between each piece of glass. As Deborah Gans said, “Instead of lines of dark, there are lines of light.”The glass was installed by Femenella & Associates, Inc., who also provided and installed the massive steel frame.

This a full size cartoon. This is Kiki Smith's full size rendering of what the Final Window would look like and the positioning of the stars.

This a full size cartoon. This is Kiki Smith's full size rendering of what the Final Window would look like and the positioning of the stars.

This is a Sample Panel that was made and presented to Kiki Smith and Deborah Gans for their approval. 

This is a Sample Panel that was made and presented to Kiki Smith and Deborah Gans for their approval. 

These are glass pieces that are cut out. The paper is used to represent the pattern of the glass to be used later as a guide for cutting. I always liked this photograph because it looks like seagulls on the ocean. 

These are glass pieces that are cut out. The paper is used to represent the pattern of the glass to be used later as a guide for cutting. I always liked this photograph because it looks like seagulls on the ocean. 

This is the blue glass now laid out correctly, to make sure that all the pieces are there and that we aren't missing any sections. The glass is being prepared to be etched.

This is the blue glass now laid out correctly, to make sure that all the pieces are there and that we aren't missing any sections. The glass is being prepared to be etched.

This is the silver stain being applied to the blue glass. The silver stain itself is actually clear, but we add the red "terracotta" so that we can see where wer are applying it to give consistent results. The glass is then placed  in the fire and the terracotta wiped off. Leaving the glass now looking more blueish green and yellow. 

This is the silver stain being applied to the blue glass. The silver stain itself is actually clear, but we add the red "terracotta" so that we can see where wer are applying it to give consistent results. The glass is then placed  in the fire and the terracotta wiped off. Leaving the glass now looking more blueish green and yellow. 

The stars are now etched out and pieces laid out on a table.  The is the finished Silver Stain, which you can see by the distinctive transparent yellow on top of the blue glass.

The stars are now etched out and pieces laid out on a table.  The is the finished Silver Stain, which you can see by the distinctive transparent yellow on top of the blue glass.

This cast glass Star weighs 25 lbs. 

This cast glass Star weighs 25 lbs. 

This is the beginning of the installation. Here you can see 3 out of 6 panels. 

This is the beginning of the installation. Here you can see 3 out of 6 panels. 

Final image, Cast Star in the middle and the scaffolding is gone.

Final image, Cast Star in the middle and the scaffolding is gone.

Final Image, The completed Installation. Overall shot of window in the Synagogue.

Final Image, The completed Installation. Overall shot of window in the Synagogue.